Pride Time changes frustrate students

Jostens+representative+Mike+Annis++addresses+the+senior+classing+during+PRIDE+Time+in+September.+More+Pride+Time+sessions+are+filled+with+High+School+and+Beyond+Plan+activities+in+comparison+to+last+year.
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Pride Time changes frustrate students

Jostens representative Mike Annis  addresses the senior classing during PRIDE Time in September. More Pride Time sessions are filled with High School and Beyond Plan activities in comparison to last year.

Jostens representative Mike Annis addresses the senior classing during PRIDE Time in September. More Pride Time sessions are filled with High School and Beyond Plan activities in comparison to last year.

Alec Stoffel

Jostens representative Mike Annis addresses the senior classing during PRIDE Time in September. More Pride Time sessions are filled with High School and Beyond Plan activities in comparison to last year.

Alec Stoffel

Alec Stoffel

Jostens representative Mike Annis addresses the senior classing during PRIDE Time in September. More Pride Time sessions are filled with High School and Beyond Plan activities in comparison to last year.

Kenzie Saunders, Staff Reporter

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Unless you’ve been living under a rock, chances are you’ve heard of the changes that have been made to Pride Time–more specifically, the lack of check-and-connect sessions. While many feel as though it’s been taken away, Mount Si counselors Rachel Raff, Shauna Jacobs, and Miranda Partridge were quick to reassure that check-and-connect is not gone.

With the rollout of the new schedule, students expected that last year’s Pride Time format would continue, but that hasn’t been the case, as only two Pride Times have been check-and-connect, where students determine what to do with their time. And, contrary to popular belief, check-and-connect hasn’t been replaced by Power Hour. Instead, High School and Beyond Planning is just significantly more “front-heavy,” said Jacobs.

HSBP is a state graduation requirement meant to help students develop a high-school schedule that will set them up for a successful post-secondary education, job, or apprenticeship. It begins in the seventh or eighth grade and continues throughout high school. To meet the graduation requirement, students must complete a resume and have an activity log.

The part of HSBP that is currently making waves at is the mini-lessons that accompany the plan. Students have expressed disdain regarding how lessons are cutting into check-and-connect time.

“I think it’s kind of pointless that they’re teaching us lessons on, like, how to use your Pride Time hours and they just don’t let us use it,” said junior Ethan Rosen.

Others feel as though the lessons may be worthwhile, but simply aren’t presented well.

“Even the teachers don’t really seem excited about it,” said Aislynn Hoffman.

Because these lessons are required by the state, the counseling center and administration don’t have as much control over the lessons as people may think. The Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction’s website provides tools such as a Powerpoint about how to fulfill the requirements of High School and Beyond Planning and lesson plans specific to each grade level.

Some of the planned activities had to come in the fall semester, such as the PSAT and information about applying for college and financial aid. As a result, the fall and winter Pride Time sessions are heavy on HSBP lessons and light on check-and-connect time.

So while it may be annoying that the Pride Time we know is not the Pride Time we came to love, keep in mind that it’s not entirely the fault of the counseling center or the administration. They– just like students–recognize the benefits of check-and-connect and are doing their best to keep everything…in check.